NEWS
Wednesday January 12 2011
Platini stands by financial fair play

UEFA President Michel Platini has stood by his decision to bring financial fair play into effect and also made a joke at Juventus' expense.

The legendary former French footballer's system will come into vigor from next season with the core principle being that clubs can no longer spend any more than they earn.

However, until 2013 clubs will be allowed to run a deficit of €45m, which will then be reduced to €30 until 2017 when a new maximum will be decided.

"Everyone is happy about fair play," Platini told La Gazzetta dello Sport. "Above all the owners of the big clubs. Those who put in the money.

"I want to leave UEFA with a better financial situation than when I arrived. Everyone knew about the problems, but closed their eyes so as not to face it.

"The Champions League has become a monster if some players say that winning it is better than the World Cup. Perhaps we'll have to give something back to the national teams."

Asked if any deficit at all is immoral, he said: "But football has been like this for 70 years. Even the teams that won in my day were a little above the law, but in comparison with today the investments made by Gianni Agnelli or Massimo Moratti's father were small.

"We are trying to put morals and logic back in the game. I don't like the football where a team who buys a player without paying for him wins something. I come from a football where there wasn't all this money."

Platini then turned his attention to his former club Juventus who have lost their last two games in Serie A.

"I saw 20 minutes against Napoli. There is no shame in losing at the San Paolo. It doesn't seem that bad to me.

"Sure if you don't win against Poznan and Salzburg, I reckon that it will take for presidential mandates from me to give them the Champions League."

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